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EMS Nation

EMS Nation - Evidence Based Medicine in EMS Weekly Formatted Podcasts Monday - Interview with Leaders in EMS Tuesday - ALS Simulation Wednesday - EMS Journal Club Thursday - BLS Simulation Friday - Health & Wellness Follow us on Twitter! www.twitter.com/EMS_Nation Like us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/prehospitalnation www.emsnation.org
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Apr 12, 2021

James Boomhower, BS, FP-C, NR-P, has been involved in EMS for nearly 15 years in a variety of health systems throughout New England. He currently functions in the role of Critical Care Transport Specialist-Paramedic/ Lead Peer Support Director with Boston Medflight of Bedford, Massachusetts, and Crisis and Peer supporter for the ECHO FAST team. James’ passion for EMS education is realized through his position as an instructor for Distance CME’s online continuing education program. His desire to bring mental health awareness to the EMS arena has spurred him to create the Fit for Duty platform.

Visit our website for more podcast episodes on Evidence-Based Medicine: http://emsnation.org/

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Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/EMS_Nation

 

Mar 31, 2021

Ashley Voss-Liebig, RN, BSN, CCRN is the Division Chief for Clinical Performance and Education in Travis County Texas. She is a senior flight nurse and helicopter rescue specialist with STAR Flight. Her research interests include Medical Education, POCUS, Human Performance. She is @ashleyliebig on Twitter

Mar 22, 2021

A lecture by Rachel Liu, MD FACEP on the ResUScitation in Critical Care during the 2nd Annual ResusCon 2019 at the Grandview, September 4, 2019 @VassarCME @VBMCEMS @2019ResusCon

Mar 17, 2021

A lecture by Timothy P. Collins, DO, FCCP on the Innovations in the Treatment of Shock during the 2nd Annual ResusCon 2019 at the Grandview, September 4, 2019 @VassarCME @VBMCEMS @2019ResusCon

Feb 9, 2021

Evie Marcolini, MD is an Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine and Neurocritical Care.  She has clinical appointments in the Department of Emergency Medicine and the Department of Neurology; and is core faculty in the Emergency Department as well as the Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology at Yale. She has board certifications in Emergency Medicine and Neurocritical Care, and is fellowship-trained in Surgical Critical Care from the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, Maryland.   Evie is Medical Director for the SkyHealth Critical Care helicopter transport service that is shared between Yale-New Haven Health System and Northwell Health.

She is a Fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine, American Academy of Emergency Medicine (AAEM) and American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), and is a member of the Board of Directors for AAEM. She is the past Chair of the Critical Care Section of ACEP, and active in all three societies, with a goal of bringing emergency physicians to the forefront of critical care in all realms.

Evie is an active educator and speaker, with an interest in neurocritical care topics as they relate to emergency medicine and bioethics as it relates to emergency medicine and critical care patients. She has, and continues to lecture nationally and internationally, and has won the ACEP Junior Faculty Teaching Award.

Evie is very active in bioethics, as a member of the Yale-New Haven Health Ethics Committee and the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) Ethics committee, and teaches ethics seminars in the ethics of neuroscience and of emergency medicine annually for the Sherwin B. Nuland Summer Institute in Bioethics at Yale. She has been awarded the Grenvik Family Ethics Award from SCCM.

Evie is a co-editor of the textbook: Emergency Department Resuscitation of the Critically Ill, which is now in its second edition, is a co-author of an upcoming book on mechanical ventilation in emergency medicine.

She has been active as faculty for Wilderness Medical Associates International since 1992, and teaches wilderness medical courses to medical students, residents, faculty and allied health professionals nationally and internationally, as well as having served as Faculty Advisor to wilderness medicine interest groups at the University of Maryland and Yale.

When not involved in academic pursuits, Evie loves to spend her time running and skijoring with her two Siberian Huskies.

Please leave us your thoughts and comments, we'd love to dig further into this topic.  Make sure to leave @EMS_Nation a 5 star review wherever you listen to podcasts and to share the episode with friends and colleagues to pass along this #FOAMed resource.

Checkout the blog at EMSNation.org and say hello to Dr. Faizan H. Arshad on Twitter and Instagram @emscritcare.

Wishing everyone a safe tour!

Jun 16, 2020

Dr. Mark Merlin Chair of the NJ EMS Council. He is the Founder of the of the New Jersey EMS Fellowship. He is the Medical Director of Medway Air Ambulance which has 10 fixed wing planes transporting hundreds of medical patients each month
throughout the world. He has authored over 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts and abstracts in Emergency Medicine and EMS. Dr. Merlin is the CEO of MD1 which provides Emergency Medical Services in a mobile Emergency Department/Operating Room at no charge to citizens of New Jersey.

 

https://md1program.org/

 

Please leave us your thoughts and comments, we'd love to dig further into this topic.  Make sure to leave @EMS_Nation a 5 star review wherever you listen to podcasts and to share the episode with friends and colleagues to pass along this #FOAMed resource. 

Checkout the blog at EMSNation.org and say hello to Dr. Faizan H. Arshad on Twitter and Instagram @emscritcare.

Wishing everyone a safe tour!

 

 

May 23, 2020

Perseverance, or more simply stated, Grit, is a common trait amongst EMS providers.  It grants us the ability to endure in the face of hardship when others may consider quitting or failing.  In regards to COVID 19, we are all playing the long game, it is a marathon (unfortunately) rather than a sprint.  We must stay united as a group and stay true to our mission of supporting and protecting our communities despite the pandemic.  That is not to say that we are not human ourselves.  While perseverance is one of the characteristics I value most in EMS providers, another virtue I’d care to juxtapose it to is vulnerability. In any situation that presents a threat — be it physical or emotional — our natural instinct is to protect ourselves. That's just basic survival. We try to defend, hide or deny our own insecurities and weaknesses. Being vulnerable involves letting yourself feel all things — the good, the bad and the not-so-pretty — and then also letting someone else see it all. Trying to be invulnerable can be exhausting, as much as we’d like to be super heroes protecting the population from medical maladies we must also acknowledge our own humanity.  This is not easy and it’s okay to express that and seek support.  When we numb feelings like fear, embarrassment and pain, we also numb excitement, hope, gratitude and happiness. Allowing vulnerability into our lives can rejuvenate our senses and actually foster, build and restore our community and make us more connected. I’m including the link to Brene Brown’s TED talk on vulnerability that has nearly 50 million views. Thank you all again for always being in service and a very happy EMS Week.

 

https://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_the_power_of_vulnerability

 

Today’s episode brings us 2 EMS physicians from Stanford on the topic, “Where have all the STEMIs gone?” where we dive into the literature and statistics on cardiac arrest, dying at home, emergency department volume and numerous other items related to COVID19. Interestingly both domestically and abroad there has been a dramatic reduction in heart attacks, strokes and traumas that have been presenting via EMS to the ED.  We discuss potential hypotheses into this phenomenon and also explore other salient details related to COVID. 

 

Bryan David Sloane, MD – Is the current EMS fellow at Stanford University.  He did his residency at Harbor UCLA where he lived out his EMERGENCY! Dreams.  He was an EMT in LA for 6 years before medical school and considers himself an EMT first and a physician second.  He hopes to take an attending position at Kaiser South Sacramento where he will also be working on many local EMS initiatives.

 

Gregory H. Gilbert, MD - Clinical associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University. Medical Director of San Mateo County and EMS Fellowship Director at Stanford University. He grew up in New York State and received his MD, from SUNY Downstate with distinction for investigative scholarship. He completed his emergency medicine training in Atlanta, Georgia at Emory University and is dual boarded in EM and EMS. 

Please leave us your thoughts and comments, we'd love to dig further into this topic.  Make sure to leave @EMS_Nation a 5 star review wherever you listen to podcasts and to share the episode with friends and colleagues to pass along this #FOAMed resource. 

Checkout the blog at EMSNation.org and say hello to Dr. Faizan H. Arshad on Twitter and Instagram @emscritcare.

Wishing everyone a safe tour and a "happy" EMS Week! 

 

 

May 19, 2020

Unfortunately due to the current situation and ongoing pandemic, it's difficult for us to wish you a "Happy" EMS Week, nevertheless, thank you to all the pre-hospital professionals for always being in service.  Today's episode is with EMS Chief Juan Cardona, from the Coral Springs - Parkland Fire Department in Florida.  

He explores the operational and logistical challenges in responding to an out of hospital cardiac arrest during the age of COVID19 starting from issues related to dispatch, PPE, the ideal location of BLS/ACLS, How to interact with the family, Infection control maneuvers and also the psychological impact on families and providers to have their loved ones pass during the pandemic.

Please leave us your thoughts and comments, we'd love to dig further into this topic.  Make sure to leave @EMS_Nation a 5 star review wherever you listen to podcasts and to share the episode with friends and colleagues to pass along this #FOAMed resource. 

Checkout the blog at EMSNation.org and say hello to Dr. Faizan H. Arshad on Twitter and Instagram @emscritcare.

Wishing everyone a safe tour and a "happy" EMS Week! 

Oct 12, 2019

This episode is a wrap up covering the highlights from the Tactical Trauma international conference on pre-hospital critical care and trauma. This conference emphasizes tactical medicine, with a panel of experts speaking throughout the 2 days.

0:10 – Introduction to day 2 wrap up

0:40 – Introduction of the panel

1:15 – Mike Abernethy wraps up his session as a moderator on Day 2. Takeaways include Michael Lauria’s discussion on the preoccupation with protocols and guidelines.

2:45 – Three basic concepts include speed, simplicity, and coordination of care. Tactical medicine boils down to how efficiently one can perform these three tasks using evidence based medicine. Take the lessons learned from the military medicine, and a lot of them can be applied to civilian EMS and in-hospital care.

5:30 – One thing to add, is being able to do the basics very well. These basic skills will lay the foundation for new advanced technologies and interventions.

7:00 – Discussion on Mike Klumpner’s talk on medical best practices at MCI’s. The phrase “Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should” is discussed among the panel members. Being able to look at these mass casualty events, their injuries, and intervention with simplistically is the key. An example here includes an anecdote regarding a vascular neck injury, and the ability to ask “Am I making a difference, or am I delaying definitive care?”

9:30 – The panel discusses the criticism of triage in an MCI setting during day 2. One example given is that during most MCI’s, the triage tags were not used including the Boston Marathon bombing, where triage had to ‘go out the door’. Another example is the way the walking wounded are huddled into a corner and sometimes forgotten, while they may be gravely injured as evidenced in the Manchester bombing.

11:40 – FDNY’s new triage protocols include any penetrating injuries between the clavicle and the pelvis are immediate red tags.

12:15 – Breakout sessions with LEO’s who discussed the medical care of the K9’s.

13:30 – The point on situational awareness with the K9 colleagues is discussed. This includes muzzling them early if gravely injured and in danger.

13:45 – Anesthesiology talks about how dogs have a fenestrated chest cavity, and its importance with a tension pneumothorax. The end result is that the resulting obstructive shock may be worse in dogs.

15:00 – Ketamine takes a hit when it comes to pain control with K9’s for multiple physiologic reasons. Morphine IM 30-50mg was preferred for K9 pain control.

15:35 – Currently, it is a felony in the USA to provide ALS to animals if you are not a veterinarian. Propositions for exclusions for EMS workers trained in animal care are in the works right now. One anecdote is during a NC MCI, kid pools were filled with ice for the explosives K9’s, drawing a parallel to firefighter rehabilitation.

18:05 – Psychosocial aspects when providing medical care is discussed along with PTSD learning points. While feelings of anger and hostility towards your patient may be natural, providers must be able to accept that and continue to give medical care.

19:35 – Learning points in PTSD. One interesting finding was that those with minor injuries who received early intervention developed worse PTSD when compared to those with severe or no injuries. This raises questions on mandatory Critical Incident Stress Management, and how it should always be voluntary.

21:05 – Best practices after tough calls in EMS. Debriefing, assessing for safety, and assuring readiness for the next job are the top priorities. Being able to spend time with your colleagues, who have been through similar experiences versus mandatory CISM is discussed as well.

23:15 – The longer people stay in lockdown during MCI’s, the more likely they are to develop PTSD. Data coming out is showing that school lockdowns are causing PTSD in pediatrics.

24:50 – ‘Just culture’ is discussed, as is the importance of making system level changes to prevent errors. Most of the time, it is organizational culture that leads to mistakes, and not just individual mistakes.

26:10 – No non-discoverable mistakes exist in EMS, as opposed to hospital-based medicine.

26:55 – Takeaways from afternoon lectures including penetrating trauma with Dr. Tom Koenig, tactical medicine in mass casualty events with Dr. Matthew Lengua, OB trauma, and blast injuries.

27:30 – Resuscitative hysterotomies in Finland, and other advanced procedures done quickly and in austere environments. Discussing the decision gap, which the is the time from when the decision to perform a critical procedure is made until when that procedure is performed.

33:30 – Advances in resuscitative hysterotomies and thoracotomies, and there are now clear indications for both. However, this does not mean that Top Cover should be eliminated.

34:00 – Takeaways from blast injuries and penetrating trauma, specifically to the head and neck region. Major points include how EMS Physicians can treat some of these patients in the warm zone with critical interventions.

36:00 – Learning points from the lecture on burn care, and the unpredictability of the burn patient. One takeaway is that due to the current school of thought, providers are over-intubating patients with harm. Studies have also shown that escharotomies performed outside of burn centers are often performed incorrectly and incompletely.

39:30 – Use of vehicles as a weapon of mass destruction has become more common recently. A takeaway is that the extent of injury tends to be worse when the attack is intentional, whether using vehicles or other weapons. Logistically, the scene tends to be complex as it generally encompasses are large area. The discussion is brought up again about how as medical personnel, we can empower and train the general public to help.

48:55 – Next steps include teaching our communities the basic skills that have been proven to save lives, and working together to minimize these threats in the future.

49:15 - Conclusion

Oct 12, 2019

This episode is a wrap up covering the highlights from the Tactical Trauma international conference on pre-hospital critical care and trauma. This conference emphasizes tactical medicine, with a panel of experts speaking throughout the 2 days.

 

0:10 - Introduction of the conference

0:45 – Introduction of the expert panel

1:25 – Reflecting on the Las Vegas Shooting. Description of the original triage station which was not setup for an MCI with major trauma. Severely injured patients were kept on scene for approximately 45 minutes, due to unknown location of gunshots being fired.

2:45 – A big takeaway from this session is to assign a civilian to each patient, as many are willing to help. This way there is someone watching every patient who could report on their overall status (ie. Doing well vs deteriorating), freeing up medically trained resources for the most critical patients. Included in this talk was a discussion in how to involve and empower bystanders, as the first responders may not be on scene within minutes.

4:30 – The concept of an “immediate threat vacuum” is discussed, and defined as a period of time where victims are not being treated by EMS. Currently, this remains an opportunity for improvement.

5:00 – Military success rests on the fact that everyone is trained on tactical casualty care, thus allowing that vacuum to be filled.

5:45 – Hemorrhage control for the bystander needs to continue to be emphasized. A major campaign in America is Stop the Bleed, which emphasizes basic bleeding control techniques for the general public. This has also raised awareness for bleeding control kits, which are now readily available in certain public locations (ie. Schools, airports) Link: https://www.stopthebleed.org

6:15 – Studies into casualties were not done until quite recently, where experts were able to analyze drills and incidents to create real timelines for casualties. It was found that victims were not surviving with current protocols, indicating a need for change. There is now widespread access to data regarding specific wounds and their prognostic factors.

7:15 – A reflection of the Pulse nightclub shooting shows that there may have been fatalities due to decisions that came under fire, as there was previously not much data available to study and prepare adequately.

8:00 – A quick discussion on how pre-hospital providers must be prepared for anything that can occur out of hospitals. There is a quick reminder that not all hot-zones are created equal, therefore every environment is different and professionals must train and adapt to this.

8:35 – Some internet searches have revealed that terrorists are using response tactics to learn and improve their terror plans.

9:30 – Brief reminder on how expanding on experience can come in the form of extensive training, along with length of service.

10:00 – Summary of Michael Lauria’s presentation on Emergency Action Drills. This is adapting the way we train to optimize response and link that to subsequent patient outcomes. One way is to look at how other fields train for high risk scenarios, such as the military and the aviation industry. This presentation looked at the medical side of training, and the opportunity for improvement in training

11:00 – Discussed here are the steps for developing ERADs. 1. Identifying time sensitive threats that need to be addressed first (ie. Massive exsanguination, difficult airway). 2. Looking to literature, and coming up with solutions to these threats. 3. Engraining those steps in our mind during training. This has worked well for other professions in their high-risk trainings (aviation, military combat). This shows the importance of training like you fight, so you can fight like you trained when it comes time for that initial reaction.

15:30 – Wrap-up of Mark Forrest’s preventable deaths by exsanguination. The presentation revisited the topics that had no research, including Hydrogel technology and others that need further research. The bottom line takeaway is stopping the bleed with basic techniques has been proven to save lives, while other technologies may be in the horizon.

17:12 – iTClamp use in head and neck trauma has been shown to be fairly effective in studies, while it performed poorly compared to CAT Tourniquet in the lower extremities. However, 7.5% of military wounds are above the neck and result in very high mortality. The iTClamp has shown success in these situations. One link to a study on animal models: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3786550/

18:05 – Brief update on Junctional hemorrhages. Multiple devices have been shown to be effective in the lab, however their field application has been limited by weight, time, training. SAM has seemed to be the most popular anecdotally. Wound packing and close monitoring is likely the most effective method at the moment.

18:50 – Dr. Kate Prior’s presentation on leadership in a team-based setting with Inclusive Leadership practice. A deeper anecdotal discussion regarding inherent bias in the team environment is discussed here as well.

21:30 – Discussion on the timing of intubation in hypotensive poly-trauma patient. Two main reasons prevailed, the instability that comes with induction, and the negative effects of ventilation.

22:10 – Discussion on the resuscitation of the bleeding pediatric patient. Using the adult knowledge in the pediatric patient, just changing based on weight has more evidence behind it now.

22:55 – Discussion on Damage Control Resuscitation. This depends highly on the setting, and resources available in that setting. Examples of this include consistent hypotension prior to trauma surgery, the use of whole blood, and following the blood pressures being less ideal than signs of perfusion and blood flow using ultrasound. One key point is that each person has a different shock tolerance, and predicting this is virtually impossible.

25:45 – Conclusion of Day 1 Wrap-up.

Sep 8, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

 

Aug 7, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Aug 5, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Aug 5, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Aug 5, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Aug 5, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Aug 5, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Aug 5, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Aug 5, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Aug 5, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Jul 31, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Jul 31, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Jul 31, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

Jul 31, 2019

As EMS Medical Directors we value the incorporation of best practice and evidence-based medicine into delivering high quality prehospital care. The Statewide protocols present a historic opportunity for us to collectively take our game to the next level.  We have worked hard to make these videos worth your while. We value your time as an EMS provider and using simulation videos as scaffolding to help bridge your knowledge of the new protocols can be invaluable.  There is, however, no substitute for reviewing the new protocols you will be exercising in depth.


It is challenging to produce something for a wide range of providers from new CFRs and new EMS physicians to experienced providers; nevertheless BLS is the keystone of all of our practice and we set out to give it the attention it deserves.

New providers will notice language and terms that may be challenging but understandable from the context or definitions provided within. We encourage providers who have participated in our educational initiatives in the past to view this video series with a critical eye. Experienced providers are likely also teachers and field training officers. In that role, look for things that you could use to teach your students. Also, look for things that the actors could do differently in their scenarios and think about how you would address them if they were your trainees. As a note, while these videos all have lessons and take away learning points, many are intentionally designed to present patient care that could in fact be provided better. 

Whether paid or volunteer, we wish you the best of luck in your EMS career. It is a noble field filled with many challenges. Be safe and never stop learning. We also wanted to specifically thank our partner in production of these videos - Laerdal Medical Corporation.  Their mission – Helping Save Lives – could not be more tantamount when discussing the nature of BLS care.  Learning to incorporate simulation into one’s regular practice can initially be challenging; however, a consistent well-designed program can be invaluable to providers in advancing multiple modalities of care from specific skills to psychosocial training and empathic communication.  

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